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Daughters of the Oak

By: Becky Wright
Narrated by: Lesley Dessalles
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Summary

The Conjuring meets The Witch in this dark, chilling mix of horror and history.

The English Civil War. The Royalists of King Charles I and Cromwell's Parliamentarians battle, both eager to lay claim to a tattered country, where life has become cheap and death trivial.

Though, for the lowly commoner, a greater, far more devious war rages. It threatens the souls of the weak, timid, and needy. Seeking refuge in the Lord's word, God-fearing folk employ the skills of one man, the Witchfinder. His success speaks of his talent to seek out, punish and rid the countryside of Witches, the Devil's Whores.

2016–A paranormal team are called to investigate, as poltergeist activity brings terror to one family. Under the cover of darkness, in silent suburbia, an endless night of battle against evil ensues, until finally, a new day dawns.

Lies, secrets, and treachery, it seems, are never forgotten…. Welcome to Manningtree.

©2017 Becky Wright (P)2022 Becky Wright

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Absolutly brilliant

As I retire to bed with my cup if cocoa, armed with my kindle and my best set of headphones I am ready to open up my imagination to my audio book. Who of us avid gothic readers have not at some time or another, relished that sinister chill running down one’s spine when a new book and audiobook of the genre has been published. I had read “The Manningtree Account” some time before, and I confess that I was a little reluctant to read “The Daughters of the Oak” but I need not have been concerned. And wow! Am I glad I didn’t because “The Daughters of the Oak” is a superb story. It is not a history of Mathew Hopkins’ activities in Manningtree. Essex. circa 1644-46, per se, but he is always on the periphery throughout the book. It is a book of fiction, but is set during the historical period of the English Civil War where life has become cheap and death trivial.
The present. Manningtree. October 2016: As poltergeist activity brings terror to a family who are scared, nay petrified of this devilish spiritual activity. A paranormal team are called to investigate, but it seems that all the weight of the past with its the darkness and evil seems to have penetrated into the very fabric of time itself. The story seamlessly transfers you between the past and the present day and it becomes obvious that there is a very personal connection between the young woman Hopkins seeks to destroy, and Mathew the Witchfinder himself. The author, with great skill and tenacity weaves a time shift that holds your imagination to the last. The modern-day tale is as harrowing as the 17th century one, as we witness the past destroying the lives of the present in a truly unnerving and unsettling way. The story is well researched and well worth the listening too and so as I slip into slumber after listening to Ms Wrights latest offering and whilst having scared the wits out of myself, I am content and know I am well served.

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Excellent

Read Daughters of the Oak after sampling, so glad I did.
It's a documentary drama with facts about the Witch Finder General with a sad story behind it.
The way women were called witches because they used nature for healing was horrendous.
The writer captured the essence of the time perfectly it kept me enthralled.
The narrator brought the characters to life.
Definitely my kind of book and look forward to reading more from Becky Wright.

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Only got one star because the review won’t let me.

It’s the wrong sort of horror. I was horrified, not by the story but by the the way the author seemed to enjoy the violation of the girl. It was creepy and distasteful. I’m no prude but it was as if the writer was really “getting off” on the description. Sorry for the slang term , saying she was aroused by it in an embarrassing way may be too blunt. Had there been any shred of story I may have forgiven her but there wasn’t. Save money and time, avoid like the plague.

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  • Paul Preston
  • 09-01-22

The Witchfinder General

Matthew Hopkins, the Witchfinder General, was a real person back in the 1640’s who was the judge and executioner that sent up to 230 people to their death in just a couple of years. The meat of this book is not nonfiction but it very well could be. This feels like such a large story for such a short book. Women are persecuted for such crimes as trying to cure a child’s fever. Guilt and execution are inevitable unless they give up the names of other witches.
However, the dead do not stay in the past. Angry spirits of some women come back in the modern time to drive out the living as paranormal investigators try to help the spirit crossover.
Becky Wright has left the names of the so called witches out, being respectful and knowing that the accusations are fabricated. While not having names did get a little confusing, it was honorable of her to do that. What these women went through was a disgusting display of masculine power that churned my insides while I read it. I really wanted to jump into the book and kick all of these guys in the round tables.