Listen free for 30 days

One credit a month, good for any title to download and keep.
Unlimited listening to the Plus Catalogue - thousands of select Audible Originals, podcasts and audiobooks.
Exclusive member-only deals.
No commitment - cancel anytime.
Abel's Daughter cover art

Abel's Daughter

By: Meg Hutchinson
Narrated by: Annie Aldington
Try for £0.00

£7.99 per month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Buy Now for £20.69

Buy Now for £20.69

Pay using card ending in
By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and authorise Audible to charge your designated card or any other card on file. Please see our Privacy Notice, Cookies Notice and Interest-based Ads Notice.

Summary

Shocked beyond measure at her wrongful imprisonment, Phoebe Pardoe finds it hard to adjust to the harshness of life in the infamous Handsworth Prison. She struggles to maintain her unconquered spirit, little suspecting that her arrest is the work of her jealous Aunt Annie. 

Phoebe has a guardian angel in the form of Sir William Dartmouth, who eventually engineers her release. But even so, cruelly disinherited, Phoebe must strive to make a living for herself in a man's world.

©1996 Meg Hutchinson (P)2021 Story Sound

What listeners say about Abel's Daughter

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    14
  • 4 Stars
    6
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    13
  • 4 Stars
    6
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    14
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    1

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

it was ok

it was alright not really my sort of book I wonder why some people can be so nasty

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

A fairytale dressed up as historical fiction



Abel’s Daughter by Meg Hutchinson

Phoebe Pardoe’s life is plunged into the abyss when her father’s death ensures that she is left only his love and a small inheritance from her grandmother. Thrown out of her home by her vindictive aunt she struggles to survive after her affluent upbringing until she is accused of a crime. Suddenly Pheobe finds herself thrown into the black despair of the infamous Handsworth prison. An unexpected angel arrives in the form of Sir William Dartmouth who eventually engineers her release. Now with her freedom but little else, Pheobe must make a living for herself in a man's world.

I like prison settings, so this really captured my interest. The prison section is actually quite short but talks about issues that rarely come up in novels based in this historical setting. I enjoyed the character of Phoebe because she is strong and capable but she is represented as a bit too pure and good. She worries about people other than herself in every instance and also makes very naive assumptions based upon her innocence. 

The villain of the piece Aunt Anne, conversely, is to evil, though her reasons are somewhat understandable, her actions are extreme, bordering on unbelievable and in this instance, Annie Pardoe is not given the excuse of madness to explain away her actions.

The plot is interesting and there are many twists and turns that tug upon the heart strings and the trials and tribulations that Phoebe has to go through to survive are realistic. But the ending I found, difficult to believe because the romance in the story wasn’t nurtured for me and the circumstances the love interest finds himself in does not bode well for an immediate happy ending. 

Over all it was a good story but there was a bit too much of the fairytale about it for me, innocent girl plunged into a terrible situation is rescued by the romantic lead and goes on to save the poor and needy. She is thwarted at every turn by the terrible villain but retains her sweet dignity and against all odds prospers.

It just wasn’t what I wanted for a historical fiction in a prison setting.



3 stars