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Winged Victory

By: V.M. Yeates
Narrated by: Gildart Jackson
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Summary

The war on the land is taking to the skies. 

Pilot Tom Cundall is ready to take on the enemy in his trusty Camel fighter plane. But as he sees more and more planes shot down in flames, he begins to question the war, and what, or who, he is fighting for.  

There is no bitter snarl nor self-pity in this classic novel about the air war of 1914-1918, based very largely on the author's experiences. 

Combat, loneliness, fatigue, fear, comradeship, women, excitement - they all are part of a brilliantly told story of war and courage by one of the most valiant pilots of the then-Royal Flying Corps.

©1934 V. M. Yeates (P)2021 Tantor

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Superb

Brilliant book that puts you in the seat of a Camel fighter in the RFC at the Somme. Made all the better by fantastic narration.

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A classic for a reason

Once I got used to the language (it's written in what I assume is the vernacular of the period and class of the protagonists) I quickly became invested in the main characters. It's a great story and an indictment of the waste of part of WW1 that is sometimes portrayed as more chivalrous than the ground war.

A fabulous novel.

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Incredible insight in WW1 aerial warfare

What an amazing story; wonderfully written and tragically underscored. Being based on V. M. Yeates' own experiences it is a vivid account of young, very young RFC pilots experiences in WW1. I had read the book years ago but had forgotten how good it is. Obe of those books were you want to know what happpens next but dread findibg out. As an insight ibti the brutality and loneliness of the WW1 fighter pilots war it is inctedible. To be fighting in those open cockpitted planes with no communication with either your comrades around you or your base, the casual acceptance of your fellow pilots disappearing and never knowing what had happened to them...brrr..chilling. The narration is excellent too. Highly recommemd this audio book

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  • J.
  • 15-02-22

From here all WWI flying clichés spring

I first read this book nearly fifty years ago while cycling through Wales. It was as riveting today as back then. Written in 1934 it is the quintessential tome of a British airman's daily life. The dog fights, the evening binges, the unhinged flight leaders, the short life-expectancy of the novice, and the comradery are all there, but Yeates is a good enough writer not to make these cliché. The protagonist, Tom, is a competent flier, but no British Richthofen. He is a good (or rather lucky) enough flier to survive long enough to develop some ideas about flying and fighting without his story simply being about racking up kills. Combat missions are interspersed with philosophical and political reflection. He even anticipates the coming of WWII as a fit of German revenge. Readers will have to accept the presence of some elements of anti-Semitism, sexism, and racial blinders that were part of the British worldview during the 1930s. There is also some flirtation with Marxist sentiments and of course the conviction that WWI was the handiwork of Capital's merchants of death. Jackson's narration is somewhat affected until you speed up the play to x1.1 and then he sounds alright.