Listen free for 30 days

Listen with offer

  • Uncommon Wealth

  • Britain and the Aftermath of Empire
  • By: Kojo Koram
  • Narrated by: Kojo Koram
  • Length: 10 hrs and 18 mins
  • 4.7 out of 5 stars (95 ratings)

$0.00 for first 30 days

Pick 1 audiobook a month from our unmatched collection - including bestsellers and new releases.
Listen all you want to thousands of included audiobooks, Originals, celeb exclusives, and podcasts.
Access exclusive sales and deals.
£7.99/month after 30 days. Renews automatically. See here for eligibility.
Uncommon Wealth cover art

Uncommon Wealth

By: Kojo Koram
Narrated by: Kojo Koram
Try for £0.00

£7.99/month after 30 days. Renews automatically. See here for eligibility.

Buy Now for £12.99

Buy Now for £12.99

Pay using card ending in
By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and authorise Audible to charge your designated card or any other card on file. Please see our Privacy Notice, Cookies Notice and Interest-based Ads Notice.

Listeners also enjoyed...

White Malice cover art
Culture and Imperialism cover art
Austerity cover art
The Fate of Abraham cover art
African and Caribbean People in Britain cover art
White Debt cover art
Fighting for the Dream cover art
The Age of Awakening cover art
Back to Black cover art
Inside Money cover art
Too Big to Jail cover art
Defeating the Dictators cover art
Very Bad People cover art
The Future of Freedom cover art
The Presidents cover art
Russia Without Putin cover art

Summary

Britain didn't just put the empire back the way it had found it.

In Uncommon Wealth, Kojo Koram traces the tale of how, after the end of the British empire, an interconnected group of well-heeled British intellectuals, politicians, accountants and lawyers offshored their capital, seized assets and saddled debt in former 'dependencies'. This enabled horrific inequality across the globe, as ruthless capitalists profited and ordinary people across Britain's former territories in colonial Africa, Asia and the Caribbean were trapped in poverty. However, the reinforcement of capitalist power across the world also ricocheted back home. Now it has left many Britons wondering where their own sovereignty and prosperity has gone....

Decolonisation was not just a trendy buzzword. It was one of the great global changes of the past hundred years, yet Britain - the protagonist in the whole messy drama - has forgotten it was ever even there. A blistering uncovering of the scandal of Britain's disastrous treatment of independent countries after empire, Uncommon Wealth shows the decisions of decades past are contributing to the forces that are breaking Britain today.

©2022 Kojo Koram (P)2022 Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

Critic reviews

"Brilliantly arranged and rich with fresh insights, Uncommon Wealth reminds us how the forgotten stories of empire and decolonisation continue to impact our daily lives in Britain - and throughout the world - up to today." (Akala)

What listeners say about Uncommon Wealth

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    79
  • 4 Stars
    9
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    3
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    55
  • 4 Stars
    13
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    3
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    63
  • 4 Stars
    8
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    3

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A great read.

I recommend this book. A concise history of many of the direct impacts on my life, seen through interesting streams of causes and effects played out due to decolonisation.

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Read this book, it's good.

I really enjoyed this, it is beautifully written and read by the author; it was for me a lot of disparate threads that I was more or less aware of, woven together in a (to me) novel and highly instructive way. I found I understood a lot of things differently by the end of the book, and I felt strongly how lacking my British education has been in so many areas.

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A well presented history, and a well argued thesis

You may or may not agree with all the author's theories of cause and effect, but this is not (I believe) a polemical book. The author's reading is mildly ironic in tone- not angry or haranguing.

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Important, insightful, connection the dots

One of the most helpful books, written in an accessible way, for understanding Britain's changing relationship with, and understanding of, the history of the afterpath of Empire - connecting it to today's struggles in the UK, and ultimately calling for furthur recognition of this relationship and change, for the betterment of all workers, not just those in post-colonial countries. For me, one of the best books I've listened to this year.

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Exposing & Uprooting an Historic Tree.

The historic roots of British colonialism with its legally enforced financial system of harmful capital accumulation, foreign debt policy, and tax evasion runs incredibly deep into the earthen soil of many former colonies (and current British territories), while its multifarious branches stretch far and wide into the global present. The copious fruit of this giant colonial tree is still being enjoyed (exploited) to this very day at the expense of the foreign lands from which it grew and the many foreign labourers who unwillingly nurtured this tree with its own blood, sweat and tears (literally).


This book brilliantly traces the development of this rapacious tree and its contemporary entanglements (neocolonialism, neoliberalism) in many of today's foreign 'sovereign' states and sadly confirms the words of the late Kwame Nkrumah (the first Prime Minister and President of Ghana): “A state in the grip of neo-colonialism is not master of its own destiny." To tackle the fruit of this tree without recognising and dealing with its roots (as this book fully explains) is not only naïve but utterly nonsensical.

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Explains a lot!

Sadly, this is all very true. The wealth divide continues to get larger. A good insight as to why. We’ve enjoyed this book enormously.

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Thought-provoking, beautifully written.

An excellent historical context to the recent events that have shaped our lives. Essential reading!

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent

A very engaging book which very helpfully unfolded a comprehensive account of the legacies of the British empire that we all need to hear. I liked the insight into the authors own perspectives from his cultural heritage in Ghana. A brilliant account

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Brilliant!

Loved this crash course in imperialism and economics. I can see why they don't teach this in school.

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Desperately needed insight and perspective

A well structured and easy to follow work that nonetheless paints a detailed, highly informative picture of its subject. Hugely important for listeners to remember that to teach history and economics in this way in schools is becoming a matter of state prohibition in the UK and some parts of the USA.

Perhaps as an old Brython of low class, I can already sense a little that my white skin is no protection against the same fate that has befallen Africans and Asians at the hands of extractive corporate capitalism. History runs deep. This is the great beauty and importance of this work. Those of us who are white are conditioned to believe that somehow our whiteness gives us some divine protection against the evils of mass poverty. We believe it so sub consciously, we do not question it. Actually, the same machine that has caused such huge global inequality in the first place is again being turned against us, as it was previous bleaker ages, if only we remembered.

The hypocrisy of nativist-backed global finance and state-funded free markets is laid bare herein for the massive scam that it is against (nearly) all of us. Honestly one of the best books I’ve come across in years, and still there is so much more to say. Thanks, Dr. Karam.

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!