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  • The Man of Property

  • Book One of The Forsyte Saga
  • By: John Galsworthy
  • Narrated by: David Case
  • Length: 13 hrs and 48 mins
  • 4.7 out of 5 stars (38 ratings)

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The Man of Property cover art

The Man of Property

By: John Galsworthy
Narrated by: David Case
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Summary

The Man of Property, the first novel in John Galsworthy's epic social satire The Forsyte Saga, introduces us to Soames Forsyte, a London solicitor and prominent man of his important family. Accustomed to getting whatever he wants, he sets his sights with absolute determination on the beautiful Irene, in spite of her pennilessness and indifference to him. Irene, a lover of art and beauty, eventually accepts his marriage proposal over a life of degraded poverty, but she swears to Soames that she will never be his property. When all his money fails to make up for the absence of love and Irene falls for a young architect, Soames resolves to force the obedience he could not buy.

Galsworthy won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1932 "for his distinguished art of narration, which takes its highest form in The Forsyte Saga".

Public Domain (P)2006 Blackstone Audio Inc.

What listeners say about The Man of Property

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Beautifully read

David Case's clear, at times languid but never lazy reading is a great introduction to the Forsyte Saga and suits the stately pace of the book perfectly. I loved the book, too (and An Indian Summer of a Forsyte, which is also included) - the pace is obviously slower than modern novels, but Galsworthy's vivid prose ensures that the reader is never bored.

Highly recommended - I'm about to download the second book, read by the same person.

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10 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Great book, dreadful narration

I selected this version of the man of property because of the positive reviews it has received. The book is a wonderful exploration of late 19th century mores. The narrator however is truly terrible. The way he draws out the vowel sounds for every word he says is entirely unnecessary, off putting and intensely irritating. The voices he gives the characters are absurd. The men all sound like they have respiratory and adenoidal problems and the women sound like monty python characters.
Avoid, avoid, avoid.

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3 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

A great English classic beautifully presented

One of the greatest pieces of narrative prose in the whole lexicon of English literature. Galsworthy took the English novel to a new level and produced a classic for all generations. It should be compulsory reading for all students of English.
And it is beautifully rendered by David Case with his classical pronunciation and gentle touch of irony. He does proper honour to a great work and his voice will live on timelessly despite his death.

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