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  • Not One Inch

  • America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate
  • By: M.E. Sarotte
  • Narrated by: Teri Schnaubelt
  • Length: 15 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History, Americas
  • 4.8 out of 5 stars (24 ratings)

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Summary

A leading expert on foreign policy reveals how tensions between America, NATO, and Russia transformed geopolitics in a Foreign Affairs Best Book of 2021

"Sarotte is the unofficial dean of 'end of Cold War' studies.... With her latest book, she tackles head-on the not-controversial-at-all questions about NATO’s eastward growth and the effect it had on Russia's relations with the west." (Daniel W. Drezner, Washington Post)

"The most engaging and carefully documented account of this period in East-West diplomacy currently available." (Andrew Moravscik, Foreign Affairs)

Based on over a hundred interviews and on secret records of White House - Kremlin contacts, Not One Inch shows how the United States successfully overcame Russian resistance in the 1990s to expand NATO to more than 900 million people. But it also reveals how Washington's hardball tactics transformed the era between the Cold War and the present day, undermining what could have become a lasting partnership.

Vladimir Putin swears that Washington betrayed a promise that NATO would move "not one inch" eastward and justifies renewed confrontation as a necessary response to the alliance's illegitimate "deployment of military infrastructure to our borders." But the United States insists that neither President George H. W. Bush nor any other leader made such a promise.

Pulling back the curtain on U.S.-Russian relations in the critical years between the fall of the Berlin Wall and Putin's rise to power, prize-winning Cold War historian M. E. Sarotte reveals the bitter clashes over NATO behind the facade of friendship and comes to a sobering conclusion: the damage did not have to happen. In this deeply researched and compellingly written book, Sarotte shows what went wrong.  

©2021 M. E. Sarotte (P)2022 Tantor

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    5 out of 5 stars

Best book on making post Cold War order in Europe

The best book on the 1990s expansion of Nato. Feels like you're in the room with the people who made all the key decisions. Amazing level of work with primary sources, totally a must read.

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Excellent and balanced study

Excellent analysis of the NATO enlargement which you can use also as a part of the background of the current East-West confrontation and the war in the Ukraine. Excellent narration.

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excellent

excellent introduction to today's problems with Russia, told from history over the last 30 years..

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  • Jeffrey D
  • 24-03-22

America's NATO problem

This is an excellent book about the diplomatic relations between the US (and to some extent its European allies) and Russia during and after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, up to the beginning of the Putin era. It is not about everything -- mostly it is a close look at the relatively unguarded and informal words spoken by the principal actors, rather than about economic matters, the formal treaty language, military details, and so on. It is detailed, and does not appear to have much of an ideological ax to grind. I for one came back from reading it with the idea that most, but not all, of the US moves were clumsy, ill-thought-out, and (perhaps unintentionally to some extent) humiliating to Russia. The Russians were of course far from perfect themselves -- Gorbachev sort of out of it, Yeltsin a bad alcoholic as time went on, and of course Putin. But the US, instead of looking into the future and taking Churchill's advice to be magnanimous in victory, treated the weak remains of the Russian empire as though it did not really matter or deserve -- if only because of its nuclear arms -- a good deal of respect. We are reaping the whirlwind of the thoughtless expansion of NATO to the very doorstep of Russia. It was Russia itself (like the defeated Germany after WWII) that the US should have been solicitous of, more than Poland and the other countries eager to join NATO

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  • CST
  • 19-03-22

Shoulda woulda coulda

Long litany of he said - she said from the 1990s based on extensive research followed by a short general analysis of what might have been done differently.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Linda
  • 18-06-22

Informs Current Events

This book helped me better understand the dynamics of the US relationship with Europe and Russia.

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  • See Reverse
  • 29-05-22

Unresolved Order: 30 Years On

In contrast to the new world order established in Europe following WW2, the decline and demise of the Soviet Union preserved the seeds of future conflict between the world and Russia. In the late 1980's and early 1990's the author describes a short window where many different outcomes were possible to heal the wounds of the Cold War. While opportunities identified and cultivated from this period led to a period of global peace and economic growth, the unresolved issues of the time continue to weigh over Europe more than 30 years onward. If you're curious about the conflict of Russia and Ukraine, or about Russia's isolation from the rest of the world, the foundation is covered in this relevant, and timely book.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 21-05-22

Informative history but tead too fast

This book provides a very well researched and informative history of US-Russian relations from the collapse of the Berlin Wall to the present day. It helps the reader understand the geopolitical shifts on the European continent that contributed to the current invadion of Ukraine. I highly recommend this book but personally would have preferred reading the print version. The narrator reads too fast. I was very interested in the subject matter but had difficulty processing the information at the speed at which it was presented, which was rapid fire. I constantly had to go back and replay (and I am a prolific reader of non-fiction). It was tiring and very annoying. The only reason I could follow it at all was because I lived through the era and took a few college courses on Russian history. For such a heavy subject matter, the narrator should have read more slowly.

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  • Randall Mayer
  • 29-04-22

Relevant to where we are today in Ukraine

Interesting narratives from behind the scenes how NATO expanded and came into being in the last 30 years

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • joshua
  • 26-04-22

Thorough

Wonderfully thorough and well-sourced accounting of the thinking and decisions behind post-Soviet expansion of NATO. Provides thoughtful study of immediate and broader repercussions throughout the entire decade.