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Summary

AD 448. The Roman Empire is crumbling. The Emperor is weak. Politicians scheme, and ambitious generals vie for power. Then, from the depths of Germany arises an even darker threat: Attila, King of the Huns, determined to crush Rome once and for all.

In a time of danger and deception, three young people dream that Rome can be made great once more. But they find themselves forced to survive in a world more deadly than any of them could have imagined.

©2015 John Henry Clay (P)2015 W F Howes Ltd

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Entertaining and slightly educational

Any additional comments?

This is a historical novel set mostly in Gaul in the fifth century when the western empire of Rome was collapsing. It gives a very good feel for the politics of the decline. It also feels authentic in the details of Roman life as well as the wider historical context.

The dialogue at times has a hint of juvenility about it, the characters are largely black and white, and the behaviour of the leaders and generals is driven rather more by talk of "honour" than I suspect one would have seen in real Romans. All of this creates a feeling of a teenage or young adult novel. Taking it in that spirit, I read with enthusiasm and enjoyed it from beginning to end.