Listen free for 30 days

Listen with a free trial

One credit a month, good for any title to download and keep.
Unlimited listening to the Plus Catalogue - thousands of select Audible Originals, podcasts and audiobooks.
Exclusive member-only deals.
No commitment - cancel anytime.
Buy Now for £21.99

Buy Now for £21.99

Pay using card ending in
By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and authorise Audible to charge your designated card or any other card on file. Please see our Privacy Notice, Cookies Notice and Interest-based Ads Notice.

Summary

A mesmerising retelling of the ancient Greek myth of Theseus and the Minotaur. Perfect for fans of Circe, The Song of Achilles and The Silence of the Girls.

As princesses of Crete and daughters of the fearsome King Minos, Ariadne and her sister, Phaedra, grow up hearing the hoofbeats and bellows of the Minotaur echo from the labyrinth beneath the palace. The Minotaur—Minos' greatest shame and Ariadne's brother—demands blood every year. 

When Theseus, prince of Athens, arrives in Crete as a sacrifice to the beast, Ariadne falls in love with him. But helping Theseus kill the monster means betraying her family and country, and Ariadne knows only too well that in a world ruled by mercurial gods—drawing their attention can cost you everything. 

In a world where women are nothing more than the pawns of powerful men, will Ariadne's decision to betray Crete for Theseus ensure her happy ending? Or will she find herself sacrificed for her lover's ambition?

Ariadne gives a voice to the forgotten women of one of the most famous Greek myths and speaks to their strength in the face of angry, petulant gods. Beautifully written and completely immersive, this is an exceptional debut novel.

©2021 Jennifer Saint (P)2021 Headline Publishing Group Ltd

Critic reviews

"Exquisitely written and exceptionally moving, this is a mythical retelling to savour." (Elodie Harper, author of The Wolf Den)

What listeners say about Ariadne

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    230
  • 4 Stars
    110
  • 3 Stars
    40
  • 2 Stars
    10
  • 1 Stars
    3
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    245
  • 4 Stars
    86
  • 3 Stars
    16
  • 2 Stars
    8
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    204
  • 4 Stars
    96
  • 3 Stars
    34
  • 2 Stars
    10
  • 1 Stars
    8

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

not very good.

if being a book written by a woman about a woman makes something feminist. then this is a feminist book. however in my opinion it is simply a Mills and boon style rewriting of the myth of Ariadne. beautiful told by the narrator however it is as if somebody had copied Madeline Millers homework. if you enjoyed the nuance and beauty of Madeline Miller circe then this book will likely irritate you.

15 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Ancient Greek Chiton Ripper

Where to start? Whilst the reader did her level best with the material this absolute mess of a book is basically a bizarre Mills & Boon set in mythological Greece. Saying that, the author plays fast and loose with the actual myths in order to present a devilishly caddish Theseus, all rippling muscles and ‘icy green eyes’, and our eponymous heroine, the fragrant and patently English middle class Ariadne who in modern life would drive a Chelsea Tractor and wear Hunters with her print frock. Her later romance with the god Dionysus - yes - descends into inadvertently hilarious domestic farce quite quickly and like so many contemporary writers ‘doing’ Ancient Greek Myths she has no concept of symbolism, religious faith or indeed, mythology. If you want the genuine article, listen to Mary Renault’s The Mask Of Apollo. If you want bulging thews and fluttering hearts give this a go and the best of luck.

9 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • CV
  • 26-06-21

A wonderful listen!

God, Theseus is such a coward isn’t he? Also, Phaedra was as annoying as I thought she was from the very start. Was a pity though.. because she was a smart girl. I really enjoyed this listen and thought that it was narrated very well.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Heartbreaking - in every way brilliant

Such a gut wrenchingly sad story. Written and performed with such beauty and tenderness. Outstanding

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Beautiful story

I couldn't put this book down, or more accurately stop listening to it. The narrator is fantastic, she even carries off male voices with no problem and had me crying in certain parts, the emotions felt so raw.

The mythology behind this is sound and it's absolutely fantastic that a previously generally ignored figure from the time of gods and monsters has been given her place in fictional history.

Honestly, if you want to lose yourself to a beautifully crafted story, this is for you.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

amazing narrator, fantastic story

oh my gosh the narrator is SO GOOD. I cried at the end and I'm sure it was because she was so amazing as well as the story.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Eh

(Spoilers ahead)
This ending is unforgivable, mostly because it doesn't make any goddamn sense.

The book was pretty "meh" in the beginning, then turned relatively good around 40% of it (when Dionysos steps in), but then, oh boy, did the text fell into a dark pit of mess again. Jennifer Saint, attempting to truly write a feminist retelling, tries to antagonise every male character in this story (except, mabye, Hyppolitus). Dunno if she knows, and there are ofc many variants of the story, but Dionysos has no "secret dark side" concealed from his wife. Ariadne participated in the dionysias, countless classical murials will show you so. So she shrinking away from her husband, finding the rites revolting, doesn't make much sense to me...

Not to mention, in the myths Dionysos immortalises Ariadne just like he did his mother. Ariadne, frantically running up to Perseus (who should be long dead by the time Thesus' and Ariadne's even born, since Heracles is his offspring) just to look into Medusa's eyes... Come on.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Wonderful dramatic narration

I haven’t been able to get the book yet but hope to read it soon. This is a good dramatic audible for long distance runners and car journeys. The plot is women centred and the dual narration works well. It’s not scholarly like Natalie Haynes but very accessible to a modern audience.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

LOVED this novel and an impeccable performance

I recently listened to another book with one narrater voicing two characters (the children of jocasta) and the two characters were so hard to decipher.

This was in no way the case with this novel. I actually had to check there weren't two narrators.

The story develops and changes over and over. By the end I'd forgotten the Minotaur and Labrynth even existed! Thoroughly entertaining listen which truly takes you on a journey with the characters. Both clever story telling and wonderful narration bring this story to life.

Will definitely listen to this book again.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Weird. Great at places, bizzare end

I am a fan of Greek mythology and seeing a book about often overlooked Ariadne sparked my interest. It has a lulling rhythm, interesting visual painting at times. But the end... well it made no sense. much as the half of the book was keeping a loose but enjoyable grip on the myths, part four and the end strive as far as possible in the opposite direction to drive a very weird point. As much as it had the opportunity to play into Greek tragedy or give a happy ending, it opted for angst that contradicts everything set up before. To Kristin Atherton's credit, she delivered a mostly compelling performance that made the whole experience enjoyable, even if the choices at the end tore at my heart and knowledge of the myth the book is derived from.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 20-03-22

Boooooring

There is absolutely no reason why it would be better to read this version than the original Greek myth. There is a lot of internal monologue, but the story of what has happened could be told on no more than 20 pages.
Until now I thought Ariadne to be cool, but in this version she is pretty much whining all the time. She contemplates and contemplates what she should do, and this is more or less followed by her inaction, at least untill the very end.
Also, way too much of misandry in this book for my taste - and I consider myself to be a feminist!
I also disliked the narrator. Her voice is as bland as the story.