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Editor reviews

Performer Gildart Jackson's deep voice and British accent recalls a younger Vincent Price, and adds real ghoulish drama to this collection of bloodsucking tales from near and far. Alongside more familiar names such as Bram Stoker and Sabine Baring-Gould, there are tales from Pu Songling of China, Mary Fortune of Australia, George Whyte-Melville of Scotland, and more. All are presented with an in-depth introduction that adds context to the tale. Some stories involve a more subtle spook while others are more action-oriented, but all are likely to give you a delicious chill. A spine-tingling treat for fans of the vampire genre and supernatural horror in general.

Summary

Long lost to the public in out-of-print pulp magazines, dusty Victorian anthologies, and the pages of now defunct newspapers, these vintage vampire stories have truly proved immortal.

Resurrected now for the year 2011, this is a stunning collection of nineteenth-century vampire stories by heavyweights such as Sabine Baring-Gould and Bram Stoker. These rare stories are arranged in chronological order from 1846 to 1913 and are compiled by two of the world's leading vampire anthologists and experts.

©2011 Skyhorse Publishing (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

What listeners say about Vintage Vampire Stories

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Some excellent stories.

There are some excellent stories, some are of historical interest only, in my opinion.However, I listened all through and some I have gone back to listen again, one story 3 times.GJ Whyte Melville’s story ( chapter 7) is one of the best vampire stories I have ever read.Beautiful narration, just perfect for these supernatural stories.

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Interesting

I enjoyed this look into Vintage Vampire Tales, especially the different forms those vampires took.

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Good stories Spoiled

there are good Vampire stories sadly spoiled by bad narration which is a shame.

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What a find!

Hours of stories with their authors' biogs. What an enjoyable anthology! All for free! Heaven!

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  • Elisabeth
  • 28-03-21

Interesting, little known, early vampire stories

This is a compilation of very early vampire stories that aren't the usual suspects that are generally chosen for vampire anthologies. I had come across 'The Blood Drinking Corpse' before, and 'The Blood Fetish' seemed familiar, but the others were all new to me. In a nice touch there is a short section about the author and the story before each entry. This is particularly nice when the compilation is on audio. The narration by Gildart Jackson is very good. This is an enjoyable free selection from Audible.
The Blood Drinking Corpse (1679), by Pu Songling. 3 stars. A very early story of the undead, involving some travelers who chose the wrong barn to spend the night in. This has also been translated as 'The Resuscitated Corpse' and as 'Living Dead'. It is short and straight to the point.
The Vampire; or Pedro Pacheco and the Bruxa (1863), by William H.G. Kingston. 3.5 stars. This is an interesting early take on the vampire genre that can be enjoyed on multiple levels. It can be enjoyed as a fun creepy story that was interestingly first published in a collection of children's tales while being rather gruesome for children. Also, an entire treatise could be written on the aspect of the story that scapegoats women as the bruxa which is much closer to the modern interpretation of witches than it is to vampires. Though interestingly the bruxa, who are women who aren't pious enough and get tricked into being converted to these bruxa are able to transform at night into owls or bats. This predates Dracula and his bat transformation by many years. The bruxa are attributed with the murder of children, so women are blamed for a high childhood mortality rate. Then there is Pedro, the bon vivant who gets ensnared by a bruxa. He ends up having a nighttime adventure much to the chagrin of his severe wife.
The White Maniac: A Doctor's Tale (1867), by Mary Fortune. 4 stars. Which one of the inhabitants of the white house is actually mad? An interesting and original early take on the vampire tale.
Madame de St. Croix (1869), by G.J. Whyte-Melville. 3 stars. Historically interesting. This is an excerpt from the longer 'Bones and I: Or the Skeleton at Home'. It is entitled 'The Vampire' and involves a woman of eternal youth and the man who keeps crossing her path.
Margery of Quether (1884), by Sabine Baring-Gould. 3 stars. Another weird early vampire tale involving a creature that resides in a belfry. What is interesting is how the victim and the townsfolk react to this creature.
Count Wampyr (1890), by Bram Stoker. Early notes for the novel Dracula.
A Kiss of Judas (1893), by Julian Osgood Field. 3 stars. This is a very loose interpretation of vampire as this story is peopled by a creature described as more of a demon. It does score points for originality. The protagonist, Colonel 'Hippy' Rowan, has a very strange encounter on a cruise ship. He inadvertently insults a stranger who is hell bent to have his revenge.
Herself (1894), by Mary Elizabeth Braddon. 2.5 stars. Braddon was a popular, prolific, Victorian author of what was called 'sensation fiction'. 'Herself' is one of her less widely known stories. it involves an heiress who inherits an Italian Villa, much to her detriment.
The Priest and His Cook (The Vampire) (1895), by Prof. P. Jones. 4 stars. This is an excerpt from 'The Pobratim: A Slav Novel', which contains Slavic folk tales. A story within a story. The first story about the greedy priest and his unpleasant cook is very humorous. The larger story involves a man who is trying to prevent his brother from becoming a vampire.
The Woman With the Oily Eyes (1899), by Dick Donovan. 3.5 stars. A suspenseful tale of a man trying to rescue his friend from a diabolical woman he has become entangled with much to the devastation of his bride.
The Story of Annette (From the Official Files), a Sequel/Prequel to The Woman With the Oily Eyes, by Dick Donovan. 2 stars. This really doesn't add much to the story.
The Vampire (1901), by Hugh McCrae. 2 stars. This is a weirdly romantic poem about an encounter with a vampire by an Australian author.
Medusa (1902), by Phil Robinson. 3 stars. Another tempting female vamp with mesmerizing eyes.
The Lover's Ordeal (1905), by R. Murray Gilchrist. 2.5 stars. The ordeal in question is that a young man is given the task of staying the night in a haunted house that belongs to his betrothed.
The Vengeance of the Dead (1907), by Lionel Sparrow. 2 stars. Spiritualists, Hindu mysticism, revenge, and murder. Too much exposition.
The Blood Fetish (1909), by Morley Roberts. 3.5 stars. A widely travelled, largely forgotten author. This story was inspired by an incident that occurred when the author was in Africa. A fun, creepy story story about an unusual hand.
Appendix: Vampires and Ghouls (1871), by Charles Dickens Jr. A mildly interesting history of beliefs in vampires.

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  • Bee
  • 06-09-20

the whole thing is worth 5 stars just for Margery

I laughed out loud more then once at the story of Mrgery. I would have paid for that one. but i didn't have to since this one is a freebie. Thanks Audiible.

5 people found this helpful

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  • Paul
  • 21-11-20

A treasury of old vampire stories

This is a veritable treasury of old vampire stories. Much from the time before the classics. Some amongst them are excellent, and almost all more interesting than the more contemporary writings.

Do not expect jump scares. These are mostly slow moving tales of seductive and hypnotic vampires, mysteries that the hero tries to solve rather than battles he or she fights in open. Some of them are also rather humorous.

The reader is excellent. It often feels incredible that all stories are read by the same person.

3 people found this helpful

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  • Carolyn
  • 12-07-22

Great unfamiliar stories

every story is different and well told. all are unusual and unknown vampire stories.

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  • Jennifer C.
  • 06-05-22

Hidden Gems

It is such a delight to find the written thoughts of not just different cultures but whole generations and civilisations on the vampiric lore.