Listen free for 30 days

Listen with a free trial

One credit a month, good for any title to download and keep.
Unlimited listening to the Plus Catalogue - thousands of select Audible Originals, podcasts and audiobooks.
Exclusive member-only deals.
No commitment - cancel anytime.
Buy Now for £17.19

Buy Now for £17.19

Pay using card ending in
By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and authorise Audible to charge your designated card or any other card on file. Please see our Privacy Notice, Cookies Notice and Interest-based Ads Notice.

Summary

Nick Lansing and Susy Branch are young, attractive but impoverished New Yorkers. They are in love and decide to marry, but realise their chances of happiness are slim without the wealth and society that their more privileged friends take for granted. Nick and Susy agree to separate when either encounters a more eligible proposition.

However, as they honeymoon in friends' lavish houses, from a villa on Lake Como to a Venetian palace, jealous passions and troubled consciences cause the idyll to crumble.

©2009 BBC Audiobooks Ltd (P)2014 Audible, Inc.

What listeners say about The Glimpses of the Moon

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    50
  • 4 Stars
    11
  • 3 Stars
    8
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    1
Performance
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    46
  • 4 Stars
    13
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    42
  • 4 Stars
    11
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Worth a listen if you like a rattling good, if predictable, love story

A well constructed love story, lots of careful analysis of feelings partnered with the social pressures of the times and their expectations. I really enjoyed it. A cut above the current TV spectacular "The Guilded Âge." She was a gifted writer.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

The ugly voice of Audible spoils every book.

The bullfrog-like voice of audible bursts in the very second the novel ends, ruining the elgaic mood. However, I liked the reader's interpretation of Suzy, making her more playful and accessible than I had imagined. It's a charming book, an antidote to The House of Mirth and minus the anti-semitism.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

wonderful moving book

susie the heroine of this story makes a life affirming journey. beautifully written and read.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Fascinating observation of characters

I loved this from the start. Kate Harper’s narration was beautiful - mellow and perfectly matched with the contemplative atmosphere of the story, and never intrusive. Wharton’s characterisation is superb; her acute observations of the little twists and turns of character development of the key players brings these people to life so vividly, they are totally convincing. I am looking forward to my next Wharton.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Unusual

Unusual story, definitely "food for thought".
An excellent portrayal of a life gone by - and the social climbers of the time.
Well narrated.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Intriguing

A fascinating and beautiful young woman who had for sometime been living it up on the largesse of the rich schemes that if she were to marry her equally penniless young male friend, together they might make such a desirable couple

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

A disappointment

The combination of an uneven narration and a weak ending made this novel disappointing. I hoped for a better storyline than this from Edith Wharton.
Why does correct pronounciation of foreign words seem so difficult, particularly to American narrators? There must be some expert guidance available but so many Audible books are spoiled in this way.
Kate Harper made all her female characters sound foolish and her male characters unreal. I almost gave up.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Celia
  • Celia
  • 13-03-11

Simple, lovely listen.

I wasn't thrilled with the reading. Except in very rare cases, I prefer that men don't go to great ends to sound like women and vice versa, This reader's renditions of the more eccentric masculine characters sound kind of ridiculous. On the other hand, when she is simply reading, her voice is perfect for the story and the mood of the book, which I very much enjoyed.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Adrienne
  • Adrienne
  • 27-10-10

A Bon Bon

This is a sweet, predictable piece of escapist chic lit. Yes, I did enjoy it on that level, but if you are looking for a story that has depth, characters that behave like real people or some food for thought move on to something else.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Breanna
  • Breanna
  • 10-09-10

Not my favorite performance

Sorry, Kate Harper, but I kept picturing muppets talking whenever you do a man's voice. I blame the director, not you.

'The Age of Innocence' is one of my favorite novels, and I'm even pretty fond of 'The House of Mirth' right up until that miserable ending, so I was excited to get into this novel, which I've heard to be lauded as Wharton's masterpiece of the Roaring 20's. 'The Glimpses of the Moon' wasn't exactly disappointing. The characters are lively and sharply drawn, and this is pretty satisfying on a level that enjoys a good romance novel.

Besides the muppet voices, though, I think that my problem with this book is that I've seen this story way too many times. Girls were taking their futures into their own hands, but still letting their silly little hearts get in the way. Maybe in those days, it was fresh and exciting to suggest that a woman might enter into a sham marriage for business reasons, only to fall in love with her husband when it's seemingly too late. 90 years later, this is just about exactly the plot of movies like 'The Engagement' and 'The Wedding Date." Edith Wharton's version is at least more interesting, in that its' characters have more depth, and it wasn't so simple for me to figure out what choice I wanted the two protagonists to make in the end.

Speaking of the end, without giving away any spoilers, the last 30 seconds may have been my favorite part. Good ol' Edith Wharton really came a long way in the art of ending a story with a balance of subtle symbolism, realism and a that's-a-wrap-but-what-could-possibly-come-next? that keeps me, the reader, coming back for more.

Anyway, this book presents an interesting viewpoint that won't seem satisfying to today's feminists or yesterday's moralists: essentially, you CAN'T have it all, and trying to do so with your smarts will only complicate the matter.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Ivy
  • Ivy
  • 22-05-22

Perfection

There isn’t one word in this book that falls short of perfection. Lovely and unforgettable.