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The Everlasting Man

By: G. K. Chesterton
Narrated by: John Franklyn-Robbins
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Summary

Few people had a more profound effect on Christianity in the 20th century than G. K. Chesterton. The Everlasting Man, written in response to an anti-Christian history of humans penned by H.G. Wells, is considered Chesterton’s masterpiece. In it, he explains Christ’s place in history, asserting that the Christian myth carries more weight than other mythologies for one simple reason—it is the truth.

©1953 Oliver Chesterton (P)2003 Recorded Books, LLC

What listeners say about The Everlasting Man

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Sheer brilliance

I've always enjoyed Chesterton's poetic genius and his bird's eye view perspective on just about everything he puts his mind to. The Everlasting Man is certainly one of his masterpieces. Not only that, it is incredibly relevant for the current modern way the world is going.

8 people found this helpful

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Moments of insight from Chesterton. Brilliant reading.

Why did you read this book?

I read this book because I know it greatly influenced C.S. Lewis, who’s work I love.

What did you like?

Chesterton has some great insights. I particularly liked his account of the Nativity, which he depicts as drawing together mythology and philosophy into a higher union in Christianity. He sees the Shepards as representing the mythological or imaginative tendencies of human beings and the Magi as the philosophical or rational tendencies. Both the myth makers and the philosophers follow the star of truth to Christ.

What didn’t you like?

I thought the book could have been much shorter. There is a lot of rambling that doesn’t add too much to his argument.

Final Comment

If Everlasting Man is Chesterton’s loosy-goosy history of the world (as one of the other reviewers called it), then his other work Orthodoxy is his personal history of how he came to the faith. I would recommend Orthodoxy to all people, but Everlasting Man only to Chesterton fans.

Performance

I really liked the performance. The narrator has quite a distinctive voice but I thought it suited Chesterton’s style and topic.

2 people found this helpful

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A challenging listen

Excellent narration. Fits the subject matter, which is profound , yet with a light touch.

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A Pure Joy

This was a magnificent account of origins, cultures, customs and religions, which all served to prove the incompatible and necessary nature of the truth of Christianity and the unlikely extent of its influence and survival. The reader made me imagine Chesterton himself was reading it. Brilliant choice.

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A journey thorough human history

Interesting subject matter. Bit difficult to understand at times. The rewind button comes in handy.

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Chesterton at his best

Really enjoyed listening to book. Some innovative ideas to think about. Worth listening. Would recommend.

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Fantastic book

Fantastically , very informative , so very relevant now, even now here in our 2021

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God

Yes. Especially liked the thoughts on prehistoric man, gave me a new insight which seems to be a lot more sensible than the myth we have now.

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  • J. Glemby
  • 15-10-11

well narrated audio of a masterpiece.

As I am aware,there are 3 choices of narration for this great book.1-Dale Alquest at the chesterton society,2-the other narrator here at audible and 3-this new one with john robbins.Dale Alquests reading is very good but a british accent realy is a plus for a british chesterton.The other audible narator is WAY to fast.So this one realy is the best.The sample clip may seem like he has a lisp,which he does a little but he reads very well and at a slow and proper pace with great expression.{note the diference of book time between the two}.Overall ,this is a masterpiece.

45 people found this helpful

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  • Candace
  • 23-06-13

Incredible.

I have to say, as someone who lives for fiction novels, this book by G.K. Chesterton was water to my philosophical soul. I don't think I've ever enjoyed a non-fiction book so much. Chesterton has such a brilliant mind, I had to sometimes rewind certain parts just to listen again. Honestly, he should be required reading for any philosophy student, or any Christian for that matter. It's such a difficult book to explain, but I loved it. I have purchased but have yet to listen to Orthodoxy and Heretics, though I've been told this one, The Everlasting Man, is his best. I have a book of his complete essays as well, which are absolutely hilarious, as well as poignant. I hope that those will be narrated soon as well.

I highly recommend this book to any Christian, and any open-minded non-christian who likes things plainly spoken in a brilliant use of language. Better than C.S. Lewis in my opinion.

18 people found this helpful

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  • Jacob Schurder
  • 26-02-13

Amazingly fresh thinking, in a very old book

Would you consider the audio edition of The Everlasting Man to be better than the print version?

I have not read the printed version, but I did enjoy very much the 'feel' added by the reader. His voice had a rustic feel that added to the ambiance of the book.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

C.S. Lewis used the right phrase, in that the book 'baptises' your intellect. The book has an amazing effect of drawing you out into a different way of thinking, that frankly I found refreshing or more real.

Any additional comments?

If you enjoy Lewis, you will probably enjoy this book. If you enjoy philosophically thinking about man's view of history, you will probably enjoy the book. I love both, and I enjoyed it a lot.

16 people found this helpful

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  • Rich S.
  • 15-02-12

An author too sure of himself

G.K. Chesterton is at his most tedious in this book. He is too sure that his POV gives him all the answers to everything that ever happened in human history.

The way he pontificates, he should have abandoned literature and run for Pope. (Of course IMHO the current Pope is a better writer and theologian.)

6 people found this helpful

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  • Vincent Castigliola
  • 08-10-12

Great Book, incredibly knowledgable author

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Highly recommended. A joy to listen to his analysis of evolution and philosophy on life.

5 people found this helpful

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  • Bob C.
  • 08-10-15

Brilliant!!

One of the greatest books ever written about the story of man and the man called Christ! An apologetic masterpiece.

4 people found this helpful

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  • M. VanLoo
  • 25-01-15

Very dated apologetics

Don't bother unless you're interested in a book that was fundamental to the spiritual development of C.S. Lewis. It shows it's age and cultural biases dreadfully. It might have meant something to Lewis but it held no charms for this Christian.

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  • Ethan E. Brown
  • 08-06-17

Wonderful Mind Making Common Sense of the Mush

Chesterton is obviously brilliant, and his turn of phrase is delightful. Equally wonderful is the inarguability of his arguments, such as whatever painted art on a cave wall was a man, not an animal. This work is sweeping and broad, beginning a an apology for a particular understanding of what it means to be human and ultimately leading to an apology for Christian faith. The performance is delightful. I have no idea what Chesterton actually sounded like, but I suspect Franklyn-Robbins offers a near thing to the real thing. This book was a wonderful experience.

3 people found this helpful

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  • Billy
  • 19-10-16

Thesis of old/new caveman was very enriching

Chesterton's style takes a little getting used to. But he is very lucid in his thought and yet often comedic. I burst out laughing at a few places. Books like these condition our subconscious mind. This is why they are so important to people of "common sense". I can see why Chesterton was called the apostle of common sense. The old/new caveman analysis was very refreshing. Read this book, then re-read it. I plan to

3 people found this helpful

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  • Ramon
  • 31-12-14

The folly of our world

This book is very pertinent to our current state in the world were very dismal world views are asserting themselves by appealing to a stale secularism, shrouded in scientism, that means to separate men from his God given reason and freedom to explore reality. The clamor for submission to the new ideas proposed by this secular society are deafening, and conformity is demanded of all; just abandon your freedom to think by yourself, and follow the pied piper of folly.
The narrator of this book is excellent, and makes it a pure joy to listen intently as it reveals the beautiful intellect of Chesterton.

3 people found this helpful