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Inventing Ourselves

By: Sarah-Jayne Blakemore
Narrated by: Sarah Borges
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Summary

A tour through the groundbreaking science behind the enigmatic, but crucial, brain developments of adolescence and how those translate into teenage behavior 

The brain creates every feeling, emotion, and desire we experience, and stores every one of our memories. And yet, until very recently, scientists believed our brains were fully developed from childhood on. 

Now, thanks to imaging technology that enables us to look inside the living human brain at all ages, we know that this isn't so. Professor Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, one of the world's leading researchers into adolescent neurology, explains precisely what is going on in the complex and fascinating brains of teenagers - namely that the brain goes on developing and changing right through adolescence - with profound implications for the adults these young people will become. 

Drawing from cutting-edge research, including her own, Blakemore shows: 

  • How an adolescent brain differs from those of children and adults 
  • Why problem-free kids can turn into challenging teens 
  • What drives the excessive risk-taking and all-consuming relationships common among teenagers 
  • And why many mental illnesses - depression, addiction, schizophrenia - present during these formative years 

Blakemore's discoveries have transformed our understanding of the teenage mind, with consequences for law, education policy and practice, and, most of all, parents. 

©2018 Sarah-Jayne Blakemore (P)2018 Hachette Audio

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Great insight in to the teenage brain

Has made me put a lot in to context . Has given me a new perspective. If only the menopausal brain didn’t meet teenage brain!

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Fascinating insights 🧠

This was a fascinating book. As an educator, supporting teachers around the world, it’s important that we all learn more about how adolescence influences the way that we teach in our classrooms, especially how this research informs policy-making decisions. Recommended reading.

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Waste of time

I had to abandon listening after the author's gushing comments in relation to Baron-Cohen's discredited mindblindness theory dissolved my confidence in her expertise.

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A Highly informative book that is backed by sound science

Professor Sarah-Jayne Blakemore gives us an intriguing insight into the neuroscience of the adolescent brain, and in so doing, explains many behaviors that are usually attributed to teenagers. From falling prey to risky behaviors, to having a self observed identity, and to the creativity and energy attributed to this developmental stage, the book teaches us a lot about the teenage brain.

While the book attributes many of the nuisances of certain teenagers to their developing brain and need for social acceptance, It felt like they weren’t being held accountable for their actions as much as they ought to have been. A perfect balance between understanding the various implications associated with this rather sensitive developmental period, and the equal notion of holding young adolescents accountable for their actions, might give us more scope when discussing some of the topics brought up in the book.

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Some annoying mispronounced words

Phenomenal book that introduces a complex and relevant scientific field in clear prose. Detracted somewhat by the reader, who mispronounces common neuroscience terms such as ‘cortical’

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Essential reading for teenagers and parents

Excellent not to technical and easy to understand, learned a lot about brain development from cradle to adulthood and more.

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  • stacy rogers
  • 24-05-21

shorten please

could've been shortened to the last 3 or 4 chapters. while history is great I want more like last few chapters to better understand my teenager.