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  • Forecast

  • A Diary of the Lost Seasons
  • By: Joe Shute
  • Narrated by: Matt Addis
  • Length: 8 hrs and 23 mins
  • 5.0 out of 5 stars (1 rating)

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Summary

Bloomsbury presents Forecast by Joe Shute, read by Matt Addis.

We all talk about them. We all plan our lives by them. We are all obsessed with the outlook ahead. The changing seasons have shaped all of our lives, but what happens when the weather changes beyond recognition?

The author, Joe Shute, has spent years unpicking Britain’s long-standing love affair with the weather. He has pored over the literature, art and music our weather systems have inspired and trawled through centuries of established folklore to discover the curious customs and rituals we have created in response to the seasons. But in recent years Shute has discovered a curious thing: the British seasons are changing far faster and far more profoundly than we realise. Daffodils in December, frogspawn in November and summers so hot wildfires rampage across the northern moors. 

Shute has travelled all over Britain discovering how our seasons are warping, causing havoc with nature and affecting all our lives. He has trudged through the severe devastation caused by increasingly frequent flooding and visited the Northamptonshire village once dependent on hard frosts for its slate quarrying industry now forced to invest in industrial freezers due to our ever-warming winters. Even the very language we use to describe the weather, he has discovered, is changing in the modern age.

This book aims to bridge the void between our cultural expectation of the seasons and what they are actually doing. To follow the march of the seasons up and down the country and document how their changing patterns affect the natural world and all of our lives. And to discover what happens to centuries of folklore, identity and memory when the very thing they subsist on is changing for good.

©2021 Joe Shute (P)2021 Bloomsbury Publishing Plc

Critic reviews

"Forecast is the most urgently needed, most important book I have read in a very long time. Here we have, graphically explained and charted for us, the indisputable evidence of the rapid decline and ruination of our natural world, our responsibility for it, and its consequences for ourselves and for every creature on our planet.... I think Joe Shute is the Gilbert White of our time." (Michael Morpurgo)

"An absolutely beautiful account of life going on while the world stopped. I loved it." (Kate Bradbury)

"Joe Shute does not rant but, with passion and expertise, illuminates in beautifully clear prose, laced with well-judged literary and historical references, the scale of the threat posed to our natural world by climate change. A ‘must-read’ for anyone who is curious and who cares." (Jonathan Dimbleby)

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Fantastic thought-provoking book

I really enjoyed this book. I found it very thought-provoking, made me reflect on a number of things and I could relate to Joe's personal story which he told in a very gentle way.